Book Trailers


Book project ideas from the gifted teachers exchange wiki.

  • Think about the events that happened in your novel. Decide which scenes or pictures from the novel a character would want to remember. Then create several of these "photos" for an album page or write about which pictures the character would want in his or her album.
  • Create a picture book based on the book.
  • Choose an interesting character from your book. Consider the character's personality, likes, and dislikes. Decide on a gift for him or her; something he/she would really like to use. Design a greeting card to go along with your gift. In the greeting, explain to your friend from the book why you selected the gift.
  • Make a time line of the major events in the book you read. Be sure the divisions on the time line reflect the time period in the plot. Use drawings or magazine cutouts to illustrate events along the timeline.
  • Write a one page paper describing the goals, dreams, and motives behind a main character in the novel.
  • Write a scene that could have happened in the book, but did not.
  • Select one character from the book you read who has the qualities of a heroine/hero. List these qualities and tell why you think they are heroic.
  • Complete a series of five drawings that show five of the major events in the plot of the book you read. Write captions for each drawing so that someone who did not read the book can understand the illustrations.
  • If a journey was involved, draw a map with explanatory notes of significant places.
  • Design an advertising campaign to promote the sale of the book you read. Include each of the following: a poster, a radio or TV commercial, a magazine or newspaper ad, a bumper sticker, and a button.
  • Create a board game based on events and characters in the book you read. By playing your game, members of the class should learn what happened in the book. Your game must include the following: a game board, a rule sheet and clear directions, events and characters from the story.
  • Make models of three objects which were important in the book you read. On a card attached to each model, tell why that object was important in the book.
  • Create a sculpture of a character. Use any combination of soap, wood, clay, sticks, wire, stones, old toy pieces, or any other object. An explanation of how this character fits into the book should accompany the sculpture.
  • Imagine that you are the author of the book you have just read. Suddenly the book becomes a best seller. Write a letter to a movie producer trying to get that person interested in making your book into a movie. Explain why the story, characters, conflicts, etc., would make a good film. Suggest a filming location and the actors to play the various roles. YOU MAY ONLY USE BOOKS WHICH HAVE NOT ALREADY BEEN MADE INTO MOVIES.
  • Read a book that has been made into a movie. (Caution: it must have been a book FIRST. Books written from screenplays are not acceptable.) Write an essay comparing the movie version with the book.
  • Write and perform an original song that tells the story of the book.
  • Create a newspaper for your book. Summarize the plot in one article, cover the weather in another, do a feature story on one of the more interesting characters in another. Include an editorial and a collection of ads that would be pertinent to the story.
  • Choose a quote from a character. Write why it would or wouldn't be a good motto by which to live your life. Be sure to cite information from the novel in your writing.
  • Create a set of four postcards that would have been sent between the characters. Draw a picture on one side, write the message on the other.
  • Stories are made up; on conflicts and solutions. Choose three conflicts that take place in the story and give the solutions. Is there one that you wish had been handled differently?
  • Pretend that you are the author of the novel. Describe the part of the novel that was the hardest, or the most fun to write. Be sure to refer to the novel.
  • If characters in the novel die, write obituaries for them.
  • Write an essay explaining how a character changed form the beginning of the novel to the end. Be sure to cite evidence from your novel.
  • If the book has a villain who is punished, explain why their punishment was justified.
  • Keep a journal as you read your book: record the dates and your reactions, thoughts, feelings.